Maple sugaring has been one of Vermont’s traditions for over 200 years and a Calderwood family business since the late 1800’s.

Our trees need to be at least 40 years old and 12 inches in diameter before they can be tapped for maple sugaring. It takes approximately 40 gallons of sap to make one gallon of maple syrup. Each tap will produce about 1 quart of maple syrup.

Our season begins in January when each tree is  tapped and ends in April when the last tap has been pulled and washed. With over 6000 taps on 250 acres the dogs and fellows are in good shape by the end of the season.

The boiling season usually lasts 4 to 6 weeks in March & April, when the temperatures drop below freezing at night and  warm to  above freezing throughout the day causing the sap to run from the taps in the trees. This is when the sugarhouse has sweet smelling steam rolling out of the stacks as we boil the sap into maple syrup. We welcome visitors to see how we make the syrup- call ahead  to be sure we are around–Mother Nature determines the hours of operation, not us!


Links:

www.vermontmaple.orgThe State of Vermont’s website with valuable information about Vermont maple products and producers.  Below is an excerpt from  their website explaining  the new grading of Vermont maple syrup:

Golden Color/Delicate Flavor (Vermont Fancy) Usually made at the beginning of the new maple season. Pour over vanilla ice cream for a Vermont maple sundae, sometimes called the Sugarmakers’ Favorite Dessert.


Golden Color/Delicate Flavor
(Vermont Fancy)

Usually made at the beginning of the new maple season. Pour over vanilla ice cream for a Vermont maple sundae, sometimes called the Sugarmakers’ Favorite Dessert.

Amber Color/Rich Flavor (Vermont Medium Amber) Usually made about mid-season and seems to be the most popular for all around use. A good choice for gifts.


Amber Color/Rich Flavor
(Vermont Medium Amber)

Usually made about mid-season and seems to be the most popular for all around use. A good choice for gifts.